Burials

Found this website on burials and found it interesting. I never new before this class that mumificatuon grew and developed, since I learned this it is something that fascinates me. Enjoy.
-Patricia

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The Fall from the Top…

If you have ever watched a television production about Ancient Egypt on the National Geographic Channel or the History Channel then you are aware of Zahi Hawass.  You may not know his name but his face and trademark fedora are unmistakable.

According to his curriculum vitae, Dr. Hawass completed his Ph.D. in Egyptology at the University of Pennsylvania in 1987.  He returned to Egypt and began teaching Archaeology in 1988 at Alexandria University, the same university he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1967.  In 1989 Hawass became the Director of Restoration, Great Pyramid of Khufu at Giza and in 1991 he became the Director of Restoration of the interior of the Pyramid of Unas at Saqqara while simultaneously implementing the site management program for the Giza Plateau.  In 2002, Hawass was appointed to the position of Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities and in 2011 Dr. Hawass was appointed as the Minister of State for Antiquities, a post he held for a brief time during the fall of Hosni Mubarak’s regime.[1]

Dr. Hawass is described as narcissistic but his ego has proved to many his ability to stand on equal footing with the West and he has helped “liberate Egypt from a posture of humility”.  However, Dr. Hawass’ greatest efforts have been his tireless efforts to have the cultural treasures of Egypt returned to their appropriate places.[2]  Hawass has relentlessly pressed upon the governments of Britain, France, Germany, and the United States to return to Egypt its iconic treasures, whether they were procured legally and illegally; the Rosetta Stone, the bust of Nefertiti, the Dendera zodiac, and the bust of Ankhaf to name a few.  But has his fame and triumphs created the same despotic leadership the Egyptian people have fought so hard to force out?  In the 2010 two-part series in Spiegel, Hawass’ employees refer to him as “a greedy guy, and a tyrant, who prefers to surround himself with bootlickers” but the major Egyptologists are more reticent with their criticism out of the concern of losing their licenses to work in Egypt.[3]

While Hawass may certainly be the “savior” and promoter of Egyptian antiquities, like his friend Mubarak, he appears to have let the power of his position overshadow any humility he may possess and his luster has begun to fade. Fired, rehired, and resignation has left Hawass no longer in a position of authority within the nascent Egyptian government.  Hawass is quoted as saying, “Over 4,000 years ago, a king ruled Egypt at the age of 8 and stayed in power until the age of 98.  When he became old, his power decreased, and the power of his cronies increased. This is what happened with Mubarak as well.”[4]  Of course, Hawass could be describing his own situation.

Now that Egypt has lost its savior, who will be the champion of Egypt’s lost cultures?  ~TB

 

Dr. Hawass and his famous hat

Dr. Hawass and his famous hat

The Rosetta Stone.  Held at the British Museum.

The Rosetta Stone. Held at the British Museum.

The Bust of Nefertiti, wife of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten.  Held at the Neues Museum in Berlin.

The Bust of Nefertiti, wife of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten. Held at the Neues Museum in Berlin.

The Dendera Zodiac, found in the chapel dedicated to Osiris in the Hathor temple at Dendera.  Held at the Musée du Louvre in Paris.

The Dendera Zodiac, found in the chapel dedicated to Osiris in the Hathor temple at Dendera. Held at the Musée du Louvre in Paris.

The bust of Ankhaf, a son of pharaoh Sneferu, younger half-brother to Khufu, and husband to his sister-wife Princess Hetepheres.  Held at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

The bust of Ankhaf, a son of pharaoh Sneferu, younger half-brother to Khufu, and husband to his sister-wife Princess Hetepheres. Held at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.


[1] Zahi Hawass, Zahi Hawass C.V., http://www.drhawass.com/ (accessed 04 23, 2013).

[2] Matthias Schulz, Zahi Hawass: Egypt’s Avenger of the Pharaohs, 05 28, 2010, http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/zahi-hawass-egypt-s-avenger-of-the-pharaohs-a-697174.html (accessed 04 26, 2013).

[3] Ibid

[4] Deena Adel, History catches up to famous Egyptologist Zahi Hawass, 10 22, 2011, http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/middle-east/egypt/111021/history-catches-famous-egyptologist-zahi-hawass (accessed 04 27, 2013).

Yummy in my Tummy!

http://www.perankhgroup.com/Food%20and%20Drinks%20in%20Ancient%20Egypt.htm

I currently reside in California and in the Bay area precisely. We are whats considered a melting pot. You can find nearly any kind of culture, food, religion ect here. So this week I have chosen to talk about food. For someone such as I, food is important as I love to cook and often do so for my friends. My birth father was a chef and I probably got my love of cooking from him. In Ancient Egypt they ate a LOT of things that we eat today. It wasn’t just about Wine, beer and bread. They often grew gardens adjacent to their homes. Onions were considered a staple food, such as corn was for the Mayans. Although for a priests garden you wouldn’t find Onions, because they were considered an aphrodisiac. Also Garlic was a big one for Egyptians as they would ingest it upon taking an oath. I find this weird yet interesting. Also, they were known to eat fish, berries, figs, grapes, herbs, birds, cattle, cucumbers, melons, radishes, endive, choriander, lotus and mallow were often made into soups. The Egyptians were forbidden from eating chick peas and beans in order to be taught the lesson of abstention. Lettuce was used in offering for Gods like Min and the leafs were dipped in oil and salted. They also consumed boiled cabbage, much like what you have on St Pattys day. Coconuts could only be afforded by the rich and of course were imported.

Seasonality

“A small number of fruit and vegetables like garlic, onions, carobs, dates, or nuts, kept for quite a while, some could be preserved by drying, a technique known to the ancient Egyptians, although the frequency of its implementation with perishable food stuffs is unknown. But most had to be consumed when they were ripe or processed into a product that would keep. Surplus produce could also be marketed locally, but few vegetables could be sent far afield without spoiling. Therefore, people mostly had to make do with what they themselves or their neighbors grew in their gardens, which resulted in their choice being much more limited than a list of fruit and vegetables known to have been grown in Egypt might suggest.”

Summer Autumn Winter Spring
figs
sycamore figs
plums
water melons
lettuce
colocynth
leeks
melons
tiger nuts
cucumbers
fenugreek
melons
sycamore figs
tiger nuts
cucumbers
fenugreek
dates
pomegranates
grapes
olives
cumin
ziziphus
carobs
carobs
lettuce
garlic
celery
radishes
lentils
black cumin
coriander
peas
sycamore figs
garlic
celery
radishes
lentils
black cumin
coriander
peas
faba beans
onions
chick pea

(CJ Lowe)

Music to my ears..

Ever wonder what Ancient Egyptian meditation music sounded like? Well, here’s your answer! In this series of 25 videos, the music of many different cermonies and rituals are played, include initiation and sacred ceremonies. Surprisingly (or maybe not), it is very relaxing and soothing, with steady drum beats and flute/pipe work. I may actually have to put this on for when I study for the midterm! Play these songs and you’ll be just as relaxed as the Egyptian pharoahs and elite!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWErSfJWzzo&list=PL4A57B0E071010432

Alexa Straughan

Looters and Rioters Threaten Egypt’s Past

(Gilded King Tut statues were among the stolen items from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo)

A lot of things about Ancient Egyptians aren’t known because of looters who ransack their tombs and final resting places. The gold and precious stones used in the decorations that accompany the dead to their afterlife are very valuable to both anthropologists and treasure hunters, so much of discoveries are a race to who gets there first. Many of the treasures taken could hold vital information to some unanswered questions left by Ancient Egyptians, but we will never know because of the successful Black Market of artifacts.

Looters have been around for centuries, and are still going strong. In 2011, Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities released a list of artifacts that were stolen from the Egyptian Museum during the uprisings that were occurring. The list contains 63 items including ritual statues and a fan belonging to King Tut, Yuya’s shabtis, amulets and jewelry.

See http://www.presstv.ir/detail/170244.html for complete story.

The protection of these artifacts is the protection of the culture. Current political demonstrations against Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year-rule threatens that protection, and these artifacts may be gone forever.

(Alexa Straughan)